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Son #3 halfway down our sled hill.

We’ve finally gotten a decent amount of snow here Up North which means that we can finally play! We’ve dusted off the sleds, and our skis are no longer lonely for lack of activity.

Woo-hoo! Snow is here!

(Someone please remind me that I was so giddy about all of the snow come March when I am whining about having to shovel the driveway, ‘K?)

So while we were being showered with big-Charlie-Brown-Christmas-like snowflakes, the boys were anything but focused on schoolwork–they were Jones’in to get out and play. So I did what any good mother would do…I made them do three more hours of homework, and then told them to clean the house.

Only kidding! I shoo’d the lot of them outside to build snow forts/bunkers/snow men/snow whatever. Once they were no longer underfoot, I made them some “Snow Paint” to decorate our yard.  If it’s cold and snowy where you live, then you should make Snow Paint, too!

All you need are a few plastic squeeze bottles, some food coloring, and water. I pick up bottles for a buck each at the WalMarts. I use them for everything–drizzling salted caramel sauce, maple syrup, and now…snow paint!

To Make Snow Paint:

  1. Fill the bottles with cold water, and add several drops of liquid food coloring. Liquid food coloring is crucial, because the gel colors just don’t dissolve as well in the cold water.
  2. Cap the bottles, and give them a good shake to distribute the color.  Add more color, until you reach your desired shade. Better yet, have fun and try mixing primary colors to make new colors! Make as many colors as you want.
  3. Take the bottled snow paint outdoors, and squeeze to “paint” the snow.

I gave the boys a quick demonstration of how to paint the snow. And since even watered-down food coloring is a permanent dye, I felt the need to make a few rules:

  1. Don’t squirt the “paint” on each other, the house, mailbox, or anything that we don’t want to permanently be that color.
  2. Don’t squirt the “paint” on each other, the house, mailbox, or anything that we don’t want to permanently be that color.
  3. Don’t squirt the “paint” on each other, the house, mailbox, or anything that we don’t want to permanently be that color.
  4. Don’t squirt the “paint” on each other, the house, mailbox, or anything that we don’t want to permanently be that color.
  5. Don’t squirt the “paint” on each other, the house, mailbox, or anything that we don’t want to permanently be that color.

And by we, I meant Bacon Slayer & I.

Son #1 caught on quickly.

He continued digging out a snow fort, and labeled it appropriately–Harry Potter lightening bolt, included.

Son #3 didn’t really want to stop sledding, but he was intrigued by what we were doing, so he made a slew of “really long snow worms,”

before going about his business of racing down the hill at a high rate of speed.

Son #2 opted to write in hieroglyphs. Seriously. He was so detailed in his snow cave hieroglyphs that I refilled all of the colors three different times for him.

When he asked for a “whole bunch of orange” I broke out an old dish detergent bottle and filled that with the coveted color. Given Son #2′s leaning toward potty humor, I intentionally avoided making yellow snow paint. No good would have come of that. ;)

All in all, my boys loved painting the snow. I loved all of the fun colors on the snowy white canvas in our yard. So if you are in a snowy climate, why not embrace the snow and your inner child by whipping up a little snow paint? It’s Snow Fun!

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