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I like bread. I like bread a lot. I also happen to be one of those weirdos that likes to bake bread, and is just sure that everyone and anyone can bake bread in some capacity. I really do! My confidence in you knows no limits!

So it took very little prodding from my self-professed “bread challenged” BFF Chris to come up with the Fear Not Bread Series this past September/October. I tried to ease you into it, with each recipe getting progressively more challenging. I started with a Cheesy Beer (or Soda) Bread, then moved on to an Herb Batter Bread, then a 40-Minute Pizza Dough.  And of course who could forget the pinnacle of the series, the Sourdough? Good stuff was happening. I did it all with the hopes that someone, somewhere who was intimidated by yeast, would take a big deep breath, and give bread baking a try. And more importantly–succeed! I sure hope that you tried. :)

After the Fear Not Bread series wrapped, I read a bread article by Rebecca Lindamood in our local paper. I wasn’t so interested in the recipe, because it was the method that caught my attention.  Her recipe was for a yeast bread that was mixed, allowed to rise, formed into loaves, and ready to eat in about an hour.  And it was baked starting in a cold oven. The only yeast bread recipe that I’ve ever made that took anything short of 2 hours is pizza dough. But 2 loaves of bread in under an hour? Never. There was just no way that I could see that a formed yeast bread could rise, hold it’s shape, and result in anything but a brick in that amount of time.

So of course, I had to try it.

I tweaked the ingredients to suit my family’s taste-buds, and made it a whole wheat bread to suit mine. I was still skeptical, especially after substituting whole wheat flour, since wheat flour tends to require longer rising and baking times. I was practically daring the method to fail. Double-Dog Daring!

But, guess what? It worked!! The method triumphed over my skepticism and altered ingredients. The resulting bread had a nice texture and a firm crust. Given the results, I had to share it with you because it was both quick and delicious.  As far as skill set goes, this bread would be an excellent step up from a batter bread.

Hmmm…this isn’t a sequel to the Fear Not Bread Series. Nor a prequel. A midquel? Think on it.

In any case, I hope that you will give 60-Minute Dill Potato Bread a try. This is my version of the original “Dilly Potato Bread” recipe published in our local newspaper. (See link above.)

3 ½ C. 100% White Whole Wheat flour

2 C. all-purpose flour

2 Tbs. Instant or Bread Machine Yeast

2 Tbs. granulated sugar

1 Tbs. kosher salt

2 Tbs. processed mashed potato flakes

2 tsp. onion powder

2 tsp. dried dill weed

2 Tbs. unsalted butter, softened

2 C. very warm water (about 120 degrees F)

Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper and set it aside.  Combine flours, instant yeast, sugar, salt, mashed potato flakes, onion powder, and dried dill in the bowl of a stand mixer. Attach dough hook and mix on low speed for 30 seconds.

Add the softened butter and mix briefly to work in.

With the mixer running on low speed, slowly pour in the water.  Continue mixing until dough becomes smooth and elastic, The dough should clean the sides of the bowl–about 3 to 4 minutes.

Turn off mixer, and remove the dough hook. Form dough into a ball in the bowl, and cover the bowl first with plastic wrap, then with a clean towel. Let rise in a warm place for 15 minutes. If it is cold where you are, it might be a good idea to put the covered bowl in the microwave or oven to be free from draft. (Neither should be turned on.)

After the dough has rested/risen for 15 minutes, remove the ball and place it on a clean surface. For ease of clean-up, I turned the dough onto the lined baking sheet.

With a sharp knife or bench scraper, gently divide the dough into equal halves.

Lightly grip half of the dough as you would a football: fingers on the top, thumb to the side. (You do know how to hold a football, right?) Gently roll the dough back and forth under your hand until it forms a small loaf. This step should only take 3-4 rolls back and forth. Repeat the rolling with the other half.

The loaves will be loosely formed and rustic. Rustic bread is a good thing. With a serrated knife, cut the tops of the loaves slightly, being sure to go no deeper than 1/4-inch.

These cuts are often called “slashes.” Slashing the bread allows steam to escape while the bread expands during baking, which keeps the tops of the loaves from tearing open during the process.

Arrange oven racks so that one is in the center of the oven, and another is on the bottom of the oven. Put the baking sheet with the loaves on the center rack, and a cake pan full of very hot tap water on the bottom rack.

Close the oven door, and turn the oven on to 400 degrees F. Important Note: You must start with a cold oven! Weird, but true.

Set a timer, and allow bread to bake for 40 minutes. The crust will be very firm to the touch. Remove bread from the oven and immediately brush the tops of the loaves with melted butter.

Allow the bread to cool completely on a wire rack before slicing.

Dill-Potato bread is absolutely perfect alongside a bowl of chowder, a pat of butter, or even sliced for sandwiches.

Speedy Dill Potato Bread

Adapted “Dilly Potato Bread” by Rebecca Lindamood

www.foodiewithfamily.com blog

Makes 2 small-ish loaves

2 ½ C. 100% White Whole Wheat flour

3 C. all-purpose flour

2 Tbs. Bread Machine Yeast (Instant Yeast)

2 Tbs. granulated sugar

1 Tbs. kosher salt (OR 1 ½ tsp. table salt)

2 Tbs. mashed potato flakes

2 tsp. onion powder

2 tsp. dried dill weed

2 Tbs. unsalted butter, softened

2 C. very warm water (about 120 degrees F)

More butter, melted to top loaves

To Prepare:

 

  1. Line a baking sheet with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper; set aside.
  2. Combine flours, instant yeast, sugar, salt, mashed potato flakes, onion powder, and dried dill in the bowl of a stand mixer. Attach dough hook and mix on low speed for 30 seconds.
  3. Add the butter and mix briefly to work in.
  4. With mixer running on low speed, slowly pour in the water. Continue mixing until dough comes becomes smooth, and cleans the sides of the bowl—about 3 or 4 minutes. Turn off mixer.
  5. Remove the dough hook, and cover the bowl with a clean towel. Let dough rise in a warm place for 15 minutes.
  6. Turn dough out of the bowl onto a clean surface, and divide in half. (Use a sharp knife or bench scraper.)
  7. Lightly roll each half to form into a football shaped loaf, and place loaves 5-6 inches apart onto the prepared baking sheet.
  8. Use a sharp knife to lightly score the top of the loaves with 3 separate ¼ -inch cuts.

 

To Bake:

 

  1. Arrange oven racks so that one is in the center of the oven, and another is on the bottom of the oven.

10.  Put the baking sheet with the loaves on the center rack, and a cake pan full of very hot tap water on the bottom rack.

11.  Close the oven door, and turn the oven on to 400 degrees F. Important Note: You must start with a cold oven!

12.  Set the timer for 40 minutes.

13.  Allow the loaves to bake for those 40 minutes, after which point, the crust should be very firm to the touch.

14.  Remove the bread from the oven and brush the tops with melted butter.

15.  Transfer loaves to a wire rack to cool completely before slicing.

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